August 2020

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Taiwan and Queensland trial disease-busting bananas

Scientists in Taiwan and Queensland are collaborating to create banana varieties that can better resist Panama TR4 – a disease that is threatening the banana industry worldwide.

Scientists in Taiwan and Queensland are collaborating to create banana varieties that can better resist Panama TR4 – a disease that is threatening the banana industry worldwide.

The latest step in the project saw seedlings from 6 varieties of TR4-resistant banana varieties arrive in Brisbane from the Taiwan Banana Research Institute (TBRI) on 15 July.

After a quarantine period, the plants will be grown in disease and agronomic screening trials managed by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) at 3 locations across Australia.

DAF Team Leader for Banana Production Systems Stewart Lindsay said the research process was a long road but very worthwhile.

‘The small clonal plantlets we received from the TBRI will need to be quarantined for 2 years before we can safely begin trials, so it’s not a quick process,’ he said.

‘But Panama TR4 is such a virulent disease, with such potentially devastating outcomes for the banana industry worldwide, that research like this is really critical.’

Mr Lindsay said global collaboration was critical in fighting the disease.

‘DAF and the banana research community in Australia have a long history of close interaction and collaboration with the TBRI,’ he said.

‘They have been at the forefront globally of efforts to develop Cavendish bananas with TR4 resistance for many years.

‘This new collaboration continues the strong relationship we have, with potential benefits in both Australia and Taiwan.’

Panama TR4 is one of the greatest threats to worldwide banana production, and has spread rapidly in Laos, Vietnam, Taiwan, Malaysia, Borneo, Indonesia, mainland China, the Philippines, Jordan, Mozambique, Pakistan, Lebanon, Oman and India.

It was first detected in Australia near Darwin in 1997 and was found in North Queensland in the Tully Valley in 2015. It is a serious risk to the state’s banana industry, and quarantine and interstate plant movement restrictions are in place to prevent it spreading in Queensland.

Former TBRI Director and now technical consultant Dr Chih-Ping Chao said the institute had been working on disease-resistant varieties using innovative tissue culture techniques, with positive results.

‘Taiwan loves bananas, especially Cavendish bananas, but unfortunately this variety has always been infected by Tropical Race 4, which can attack the banana’s roots and cause the plants not to normally develop,’ he said.

‘We really wanted to collect any disease-resistant commercial varieties available in the world – our researchers and our industry did their best in the past, but they could not collect any one that fits our industry.

‘Fortunately we started to use the tissue culture technique to produce clean seedlings, so that when we release the clean seedlings in the new area, the rate of disease spread would not be as fast.’

Dr Chao said the institute was keen to share the benefits of its research with other countries, and Queensland was a logical choice to conduct the growth trials.

‘We have the chance to sustain our industry in Taiwan and to share our experience with our partners – in Asia or the global community where they need a banana industry,’ he said.

‘Australia is such a wonderful country and also has a Cavendish banana industry that needs to be sustained.

‘And Australia has always been the benchmark in terms of respect for intellectual property.’

Queensland Trade and Investment Commissioner for Taiwan Patrick Hafenstein said TIQ was pleased to provide practical, ongoing support for such important research.

‘In 2018, we facilitated a trip to bring researchers from the Taiwan institute to Queensland so they could learn more about our banana industry and meet their peers in the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries,’ he said.

‘More recently, we’ve supported negotiations by helping to coordinate approvals to sign the research agreement across the various departments of Taiwan’s Council of Agriculture.

‘It’s great to see the project take another big step forward with the arrival of the seedlings in Brisbane.’

Queensland is well respected globally for its agricultural research and technology, particularly in tropical environments.

Biotechnology and agtech are identified as emerging export strengths in the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017–2022.

If you have a cross-border research concept you think could benefit from TIQ support, contact one of our teams.

July 2020

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AI newest weapon in fight against COVID-19

Artificial intelligence (AI) can help frontline clinicians rapidly improve treatments and patient outcomes when fighting COVID-19 – and Queensland has a role to play in harnessing this modern medical tool. That’s the message Professor John Fraser delivered recently at BIO Digital 2020, during an expert panel entitled ‘Can AI prevent pandemics?’

Artificial intelligence (AI) can help frontline clinicians rapidly improve treatments and patient outcomes when fighting COVID-19 – and Queensland has a role to play in harnessing this modern medical tool.

That’s the message Professor John Fraser delivered recently at BIO Digital 2020, during an expert panel entitled ‘Can AI prevent pandemics?’

BIO is the world’s largest gathering of global biotech and pharma industry players and moved online this year for the first time due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Professor Fraser – a practising intensive care specialist and director of the Critical Care Research Group – recently helped establish the COVID-19 Critical Care Consortium, which has teamed up with global tech player IBM and data scientists at The University of Queensland and QUT to support frontline clinicians.

Professor Fraser said copious amounts of data had been collected by clinicians in daily practice from their COVID-19 patients and it was critical to bring this data together to make it an effective tool.

‘It was a little bit like the X-files – the truth was out there already and our job was to bring the jigsaw puzzle pieces together and make it easy to do for the clinicians,’ Professor Fraser said.

‘Literally hundreds of thousands of individual pieces of ICU patient data spread around the world are a huge resource but their potential cannot be realised in isolation.

‘If we can create a database with a user-friendly dashboard where we bring these disparate pieces of data together, we start to create a picture of what’s going on.

‘Ideally, the dashboard will be able to sit on the doctor’s phone or tablet so he or she can access the most up-to-date global data and experience at the bedside at 2 or 3am.

‘Speaking to clinicians at our member sites in 52 countries, this is exactly what they want.’

The COVID-19 Critical Care Consortium worked with The University of Queensland and approached IBM for help to create the specialised dashboard, which will ultimately harness machine learning to generate clinical insights about which treatments and interventions might be most effective for critically ill COVID-19 patients.

TIQ Principal Trade and Investment Officer Alita Singer connected Professor Fraser with the organisers of BIO Digital 2020 who invited him to speak during the special ‘Can AI prevent pandemics?’ session.

Professor Fraser said a global pandemic meant the scientific community needed to look for a global solution.

‘It’s like what Bill Gates said when he talked about Ebola – just bring the data together and let us analyse it cleverly and freely so that the rich countries and the poor countries have access to the same data.

‘We need to look clinically at AI to see how we can improve outcomes rapidly, effectively, cheaply and equally across the globe.’

The Queensland dashboard has collated deidentified patient data from over 370 hospitals and clinics, including Harvard University and Johns Hopkins University.

Over 7,000 participants from 64 countries participated in BIO Digital 2020 from 8 to 12 June 2020.

Professor Fraser’s session was broadcast on demand as part of BIO Digital and is also available as a recording to participants who registered for BIO.

The Queensland Government is committed to building Queensland’s AI capabilities and global connections. In May this year it announced the establishment of the Queensland AI Hub as part of the $755 million Advance Queensland initiative.

The biotech and biomedicine sector is identified as an emerging export strength in the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017–2022.

To learn more about Queensland’s biotech sector, connect with TIQ today.

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Circa and UAP take Cube Studies global

Two previous Queensland export award winners are collaborating on a unique project to showcase Queensland’s talents in circus and urban art to an international audience.

Two Queensland export award winners are collaborating on a unique project to showcase Queensland’s talents in circus and urban art to an international audience.

Brisbane’s Circa Contemporary Circus was named best Creative Industries exporter at last year’s Premier of Queensland’s Export Awards and has taken its physical theatre to 40 countries.

Unable to tour due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, the Circa team has not wasted its time but has instead collaborated with another award-winning Brisbane business, UAP, on a unique global arts project.

UAP – the 2017 winner of the Creative Industries award – creates public artworks worldwide, and has joined with Circa to deliver public art installations that showcase performances Circa has developed.

Circa Artistic Director, Yaron Lifschitz, said the Cube Studies project reflected changing global realities.

Cube Studies is an export program that embraces the world’s changing social and legislative environment,’ he said.

‘At this moment, we are all experiencing extreme levels of uncertainty, and engagement between audiences, spaces and presenters is extremely challenging.

‘But creativity, imagination, shared experience and shared humanity are needed now, more than ever.’

Cube Studies premiered at the La Strada Festival in Graz, Austria on 26 July, and will go on tour to venues and festivals around the world that are eager to bring their audiences out again.

Each creation will be unique, editioned and documented, able to be staged indoors or outside, and will provide presenters with a solution to the challenge of managing social distancing while connecting with audiences.

UAP Founder Daniel Tobin said he believed the productions would be welcomed by audiences after the challenges of recent months.

‘As our communities begin to re-emerge from lockdown, Circa’s Cube Studies will enable and encourage the populace to re-engage with public life,’ he said.

‘Sculpture and performance will combine to create safe, socially distanced vignettes to give hope, entertain and strengthen people of all ages.’

With international travel restrictions in place, the Cube Studies premiere in Austria was performed by a cast of 24 acrobats from Graz instead of Circa’s touring ensemble, who are all currently in Brisbane. The Austrian cast was coached by Circa’s creative team over Zoom, and the performance will promote Circa’s role in the project.

Likewise, the Graz cube – designed by Daniel Tobin from UAP and fabricated in Austria – will also showcase Queensland’s urban art capabilities.

TIQ has worked with both Circa and UAP over several years to help them expand their footprints in overseas markets.

TIQ and the Queensland Government are continuing to offer Queensland exporters a range of government support during COVID-19.

Photo: © La Strada Graz / Nikola Milatovic

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Empowering Indian educators during COVID-19

More than 1,000 teachers across India recently logged on for 4 masterclasses on digital teaching, delivered by the University of Queensland with support from TIQ India and Study Queensland.

More than 1,000 teachers across India recently logged on for 4 masterclasses on digital teaching, delivered by the University of Queensland with support from TIQ India and Study Queensland.

The Scoonews Educator Empowerment Program was a great hit, with more than 600 teachers from over 100 schools logging in each day, and sessions livestreamed on YouTube due to popular demand.

Queensland Trade and Investment Commissioner for India Gitesh Agarwal said the complimentary sessions were a welcome resource for Indian teachers facing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

‘Much of India is in lockdown, and teachers are facing the same kinds of challenges that their peers did in Queensland,’ he said.

‘They are hungry for quality online education and training and the masterclasses delivered by the University of Queensland were very warmly received.

‘The sessions were so popular that, as well as running on the Scoonews education platform, they were livestreamed on YouTube from the second day to make them as accessible as possible.

‘Digital delivery is very new here, so the masterclasses were a real gift for both the teachers and, ultimately, their students.’

Mr Agarwal said the sessions also helped to promote Queensland as a centre for world-class education and teaching.

‘The sessions raised Queensland’s profile with teachers in more than 100 primary and high schools across India and helped to create a positive rapport between them and Queensland universities,’ he said.

‘The next time those Indian educators hear someone mention Queensland universities, or are speaking to their students about overseas study, they’ll have a very positive memory of what we did.

‘It’s a win-win situation, where we can support Indian teachers and also spread the word about Queensland’s quality approach to education. Generosity always gives twice.’

Study Queensland and TIQ India supported the masterclasses by working with the University of Queensland and Scoonews to ensure the class content was developed and delivered successfully.

Study Queensland is continuing to work with other Queensland universities to provide training to Indian educators in order to share Queensland’s educational expertise and encourage Indian students to study in Queensland in the future.

Indian teachers who completed the first series of masterclasses will receive a certificate of recognition from the University of Queensland.

International education is identified as a priority services export in the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017–2022.

If you have an online education product that you would like to export to international markets, connect with TIQ today.

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IMR signs deal to work on next-gen TVs

Brisbane company Immersive Robotics (IMR) has been signed up by one of the world’s leading electronics manufacturers to help progress the next generation of paper-thin TV screens.

Brisbane company Immersive Robotics (IMR) has been signed up by one of the world’s leading electronics manufacturers to help progress the next generation of paper-thin TV screens.

IMR specialises in wireless video innovation, and is working on a technology solution that will allow the large components typically found behind a flatscreen TV to be removed to a separate, connector box.

Data will then be delivered wirelessly to ultra-slim TV screens that can be hung like paintings or posters in a wide range of locations, with the connector box hidden out of sight elsewhere.

TIQ supported IMR to secure the deal, which will see the Fortitude Valley start-up working with one of the world’s largest electronics firms.

TIQ Acting CEO Richard Watson said TIQ was delighted to help a world-class Queensland business get over the line with a global electronics brand.

‘We provided on-the-ground support during market visits by IMR, helping to progress their discussions and successfully close their negotiations on what is arguably a landmark deal,’ he said.

‘It’s an incredible achievement for a Queensland start-up that was only established 5 years ago.’

IMR Co-founder Dr Daniel Fitzgerald said TIQ had helped the company progress in delicate negotiations better than it ever could have done alone.

‘We have the talent and the skills to develop world-class solutions, but we required TIQ’s in-country connections to engage effectively,’ he said.

‘TIQ provided tangible support during deal negotiations and helped with communications and advice to solve complex issues around formalising our agreement.

‘While I can’t name our client for commercial reasons, I think it’s safe to say that IMR will be contributing to the development of an innovative product to be sold globally.

‘We are incredibly excited about the project and very grateful for TIQ’s support.’

TIQ is supporting IMR with their international activities in a number of markets.

The company’s proprietary wireless compression algorithm enables the delivery of premium wireless video at an unprecedented low latency.

Supporting start-ups and Queensland’s tech sector are priorities under the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017-2022.

If you’re interested in exporting your tech solution, connect with TIQ today.

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Connect with Antofagasta

The Antofagasta Industry Association (AIA) is one of Latin America’s most prominent mining industry bodies, with wide reach and influence. The AIA is committed to promoting industrial development and growth for the region’s socio-economic benefit.

If you’re keen to expand into the Latin America market, register now for this unique METS business-matching program.

Opportunities in Antofagasta

Chile is a market with extraordinary potential for Queensland’s METS operators. In 2019, Chile’s copper mine production was an estimated 5.6 million metric tons of metal content – 28% of global production. Some of the country’s largest mines are in the Antofagasta region of northern Chile.

The Antofagasta Industry Association (AIA) is one of Latin America’s most prominent mining industry bodies. The AIA is committed to promoting industrial development and growth for the region’s socio-economic benefit and plays a key role in procuring services for its member mining companies.

Connect with this unique business-matching program

The 2020 Business Matching Program will introduce Queensland METS companies directly to potential clients and representatives in the Antofagasta market.

You will have the opportunity to:

  • connect with the AIA as a key regional association, and understand more about procurement avenues in Chile
  • promote your capabilities to interested businesses in the Antofagasta region
  • talk directly with potential customers to discuss business opportunities.

Keen to take part? Register now for this unique program.

To take part in this unique business matching program, you will need to:

  1. Register for the upcoming webinar to introduce you to the Antofagasta market and to find out more about Queensland METS capabilities.
  2. Set up a profile on the Queensland METS Cluster group on Mighty Networks.

 

About the webinar

Webinar 2: Introducing Queensland METS

Date: Wednesday 12 August 2020
Time: 7.30am (AEST)

Join Trade and Investment Queensland’s Director for Mining, Resources and Energy, Anthony Christensen and Director for Business Development, Mining, Latin America, William Lilis as they share insights on Queensland’s METS capabilities. Anthony and William will be joined by:

This webinar is suitable for AIA members, and other Latin American mining companies and representatives. Queensland METS companies are also invited.

REGISTER NOW

 

Setting up your profile on Mighty Networks

Mighty Networks is a platform that brings people together—a place to meet and learn from each other. Through this platform you will have the opportunity to meet others in the METS sector in both Antofagasta and Queensland to exchange ideas and uncover new ways to grow.

To participate in this business matching program, you will need to set up a profile on Mighty Networks, as this is where the networking, conversation, and business matching will occur.

To set up your Mighty Networks profile, click here.

 

Let’s talk

If you have any further questions about the series or need assistance to set up your Mighty Networks profile, contact Howard or Brendan today.

Howard Hayes, TIQ Mackay
Howard.Hayes@tiq.qld.gov.au
+61 7 4864 1701
+61 428 774 395

Brendan Rutherford
Brendan.Rutherford@tiq.qld.gov.au
+61 417 625 745

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Artemis Robotics: Whitsundays to Silicon Valley

Proserpine business Artemis Robotics recently rubbed virtual shoulders with some of Silicon Valley’s big players when it presented at a high-profile webinar following an introduction from TIQ.

Proserpine business Artemis Robotics recently rubbed virtual shoulders with some of Silicon Valley’s big players when CEO Darren Foster presented at a high-profile webinar following an introduction from TIQ.

Mr Foster gave the keynote presentation at an online Construction Robotics Forum hosted by Silicon Valley Robotics.

His company specialises in automated technologies for structural inspections and has already earned a reputation for innovation in the inspection of marine structures.

Mr Foster said the webinar was a valuable opportunity for the company to explain its vision as it looks to expand operations beyond the marine robotics industry.

‘There’s an enormous amount of market education that needs to be undertaken through events like the Silicon Valley Robotics webinar for new technologies on the bleeding edge of innovation,’ he said.

‘One of the biggest challenges for companies like ours is that people never understand the opportunities for new technology until they have become a fully formed presence in their everyday lives.

‘If someone had told me in 1995 that I could carry a computer in my pocket and communicate with the global community, I would have said, “What do I want to do that for?!”

‘This webinar offered a fantastic window into what CEOs and founders are actually seeing happen in the robotics industry and where they see it heading.’

Silicon Valley Robotics is a not-for-profit coalition of robotics companies and start-ups.

Managing Director Andra Keay said connecting start-ups like Artemis Robotics with collaborators and investors was all about speaking the right language.

‘In many ways my role at Silicon Valley Robotics is to act as a translator,’ Ms Keay said.

‘Once I understand the application areas and markets for a breakthrough technology, I can help the start-up tell the right story for the market.’

Mr Foster said Artemis Robotics had initially developed robotics for inspecting marine structures but the company was now expanding its horizons after undertaking research with The University of Queensland.

‘We discovered that the sensors and robotics we were developing for marine inspection had huge potential in the wider civil engineering space, which is a trillion-dollar-a-year global industry,’ he said.

‘Now we’ve moved from looking at concrete marine piles to being able to inspect any concrete structure, including bridges, buildings and roadways.

‘We’re currently talking to some of the USA’s largest engineering firms about how we might be able to collaborate with them and we’ve also just had our US patent approved for the first part of our technology.

‘It’s a big milestone for us and it will pave the way for patents in Australia and Europe.’

TIQ’s North America office has been helping Artemis Robotics with their entry into the US market and connected the company with Silicon Valley Robotics.

Mr Foster urged Queensland exporters to engage with TIQ.

‘Every time I’ve arrived in a new country and made contact with an overseas TIQ office they’ve been really responsive and provided me with not just market but cultural insights, which are hugely important when operating in foreign markets.

‘Their expertise is a phenomenal resource.’

The online forum took place in late May.

Supporting exporters to enter new markets is a priority under the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017–2022.

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Grants to promote your products overseas

Queensland exporters can now apply to the 2020 round of the Export Market Development Grant (EMDG) scheme, which reimburses eligible exporters for a percentage of their promotional costs in overseas markets.

Queensland exporters can now apply to the 2020 round of the Export Market Development Grant (EMDG) scheme, which reimburses eligible exporters for a percentage of their promotional costs in overseas markets.

Exporters can apply for reimbursement of costs incurred in the 2019–2020 financial year.

This year the scheme has received an extra $49.8 million in funding to help businesses deal with expenses caused by COVID-19, including the cost of promotional events cancelled due to circumstances beyond a business’s control.

Applicants to EMDG must have:

  • income of less than $50 million in the grant year
  • incurred at least $15,000 of eligible expenses in the grant year (first-time applicants can combine two years’ expenses).

They must also have promoted one of the following:

  • export of goods or most services
  • inbound tourism
  • export of intellectual property and know-how
  • conferences and events held in Australia.

Successful applicants can receive up to 50% reimbursement of eligible expenses, less the first $5,000, with a maximum grant of $150,000 per application.

Eligible expenses include the cost of:

  • overseas representation
  • marketing consultants and visits
  • trade fairs, seminars and in-store promotions
  • promotional literature and advertising
  • product samples
  • bringing potential buyers to Australia
  • registration and insurance of eligible intellectual property.

See Austrade’s EMDG webpage for more information. Applications close 30 November 2020.

The Queensland Government is also offering a range of grants and assistance to businesses affected by COVID-19. Visit the COVID-19 business assistance finder for more information.

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Skilled migrant’s research builds COVID-19 knowledge

A migrant who came to Queensland under the business and skilled migration program is now working on research that could contribute to the global fight against COVID-19.

A migrant who came to Queensland under the business and skilled migration program is now working on research that could contribute to the global fight against COVID-19.

Dr Adeshina Adekunle came to Australia on a student visa from Nigeria in 2013 to undertake his PhD, and is now an infectious diseases modeller at James Cook University (JCU), Townsville.

Earlier this year Dr Adekunle led a study that assessed the impact of Australia’s international travel bans on the spread of COVID-19 in Australia.

He said Australia’s response to the pandemic had been effective.

‘Our study found Australia’s bans on international travel reduced the initial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic by nearly 80%,’ Dr Adekunle said.

‘Compared to other countries, Australia did well in controlling the number of COVID-19 cases and for now, modified travel bans are important to prevent the importation of new cases.’

Dr Adekunle holds a PhD in Mathematical Biology from the University of New South Wales and is currently contributing to a number of other COVID-19 modelling research projects.

‘We want to know the effect of lockdowns on the control of COVID-19, the contribution of different age groups to the pandemic numbers and the impact of that on COVID-19 control,’ he said.

This is not the first time Dr Adekunle’s work has been important during a crisis response.

His research previously helped shaped policy during the 2019 Townsville floods, and he hopes to continue to contribute in this field.

‘During the floods, I was able to use my modelling skills to show that mosquito-borne diseases would not increase significantly,’ he said.

‘My greatest achievement so far has been the ability to use my skills to shape policy-making on the spread of infectious diseases in Australia and overseas.

‘These achievements are giant strides for me and I plan to continue to use my career to positively impact and contribute to the body of research knowledge on disease modelling.’

Now an Australian citizen, Dr Adekunle moved to Queensland to join the Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine at JCU and decided to make Queensland home after receiving a Skilled Nominated (Permanent) visa (subclass 190).

He considers working in regional north Queensland a perfect fit for him.

‘Queensland is called the Sunshine State and the state of Ondo where I was living in Nigeria is also called the Sunshine State,’ he said.

‘The tropical nature of Townsville is what I am used to and the simplicity of life, reduced traffic and easy access to fresh foods just melts my soul.

‘Also the fact that there’s this assumption that everyone is given a fair go at opportunities will make anyone want to stay and call here home.’

TIQ’s Business and Skilled Migration Queensland (BSMQ) team is responsible for state nomination of business and skilled migrants.

More information about business migration to Queensland is available on the BSMQ website.

Attracting global talent to Queensland is one of the goals of the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017–2022.

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Sun Metals to build NQ green hydrogen plant

North Queensland’s first renewable hydrogen facility will be built at Townsville’s Sun Metals Zinc Refinery thanks to a $5 million Queensland Government grant.

North Queensland’s first renewable hydrogen facility will be built at Townsville’s Sun Metals Zinc Refinery, thanks to a $5 million Queensland Government grant.

The project will establish North Queensland’s renewable hydrogen supply chain and boost Townsville’s profile as a hydrogen hotspot, using funds from the $15 million Hydrogen Industry Development Fund.

Sun Metals CEO Kiwon Park said the company was delighted to start its hydrogen journey with the support of the Queensland Government.

‘This first phase of our hydrogen project will only be the beginning of developing a substantial renewables hydrogen industry based in Townsville, which we hope in the long-term will create export opportunities,’ Mr Park said.

‘The hydrogen project is part of Sun Metals’ long-term plans for a totally integrated operation, including our zinc refinery, solar farm and other operations at Stuart.’

Hydrogen has traditionally been produced using fossil fuels, which release carbon dioxide emissions during production.

Many countries are now looking to hydrogen produced using renewable power as a sustainable fuel for transport, power generation and other industrial uses.

Townsville has been identified as 1 of 3 hydrogen industry hotspots in Queensland, alongside Gladstone and Redlands, due to its prime location for renewable hydrogen production and export opportunities.

In early 2020, the state government appointed 3 Hydrogen Industry Champions to boost the profile of renewable hydrogen in those regions and promote fast-emerging opportunities in the industry.

State Development Minister Kate Jones said the Hydrogen Industry Development Fund would ensure Queensland leads the way in renewable hydrogen development in Australia.

‘Hydrogen has huge potential to pump millions of dollars into our economy and create jobs for workers in Townsville,’ Ms Jones said.

‘That’s why last year we released the Queensland Hydrogen Industry Strategy 2019–2024 to help position Queensland at the forefront of renewable hydrogen production in Australia by 2030.

‘The Queensland Government has committed to transition to a clean energy future and we are pleased to be supporting regional projects that promote innovation, deliver economic growth and highly skilled jobs for Queenslanders.’

Queensland has a number of existing and proposed renewable hydrogen projects, and is already a hydrogen leader among Australian states.

TIQ hosted delegations interested in hydrogen and renewable energy from Korea and Japan in 2019, and represented Queensland alongside other global hydrogen leaders at the World Hydrogen Fuels Summit in Amsterdam in March this year.

Renewables and biofuels are identified as a growing export market in the Queensland Trade and Investment Strategy 2017–2022.